Keep the building warm in the winter and cool in the summer. Comfortable with little to no utility bill / fossil fuel.

This increases both psychological and physiological comfort.

Both the International Building Code and the International Residential Code have requirements for maintaining a minimum temperature in buildings. They do not have requirements for a maximum temperature in buildings though there are ventilation system requirements and there are reasonable standards for comfort.Sustainable designs for cold climates

The IBC requires that interior spaces that are intended for human occupancy need to be able to maintain a minimum interior temperature of 68 degrees at a point 3 feet above the floor. This can be done actively, passively or with a combination of the two methods. The system design is based on the design heating day for the location.

The IRC is slightly more forgiving, it says that the 68 degrees must be maintained at a point 3 feet above the floor and 2 feet from the exterior wall. You only have to provide the system where winter design temperatures are below 60 degrees. Portable space heaters can’t be used to meet the requirement

sustainable designs for hot climates

A building must be warm in the winter and cool in the summer.

Humans have been heating their buildings with various resources over the centuries. The sun is the strongest and most consistent source of heat. It is also free, abundant and clean.

Passive House Diagram

There is plenty of heat coming from the sun. By directing the building toward the sun and having larger windows facing the sun, heat gain from the sun, called solar gain can be maximized. The maximized heat that is now coming into the building from the sun can be stored within thermal mass. This Thermal mass can be any earth-type material. Dirt, rock, stone, liquids such as water, beer, etc.

By adhering to and utilizing design directives as well as small, subtle ones, a building can stay warm in the winter and cool in the summer with no fossil fuels, no machines and no direct cost. The design directives come from the physics of the planet and the environmental characteristics of the local building site. Taking into account all environmental aspects of the building site will allow the building to maximize its performance potential. For example. is there full horizon to horizon sun? Are there any tall trees blocking the heat from the sun to the building? At what latitude is the local building site?

 

earthship biotecture

 

Comfort

Thermal Comfort
Adaptive Comfort
Comfort: Codes & Regulations

Passive Solar

Heat Flow
Radiant Energy
Passive Solar Energy Gain
Direct Solar Gain Systems
The Greenhouse Effect
Sunspaces / Greenhouses Thermosiphon (Convective-Loop System) Trombe Walls
Surface Color & Solar Gain
Roofs
Drawing Sun Beams
Review: Passive Solar

What is a Passive Building?

The Principles of a Passive Building
History of the ‘PassiveHaus’ / ‘Passive House’

Climate

Climate Specific Design Considerations
Winter Design Strategies
Summer Design Strategies
Renovations and additions
Other thermal mass options

Insulation

How Insulation Works
Footing Insulation
Frost Line
Frost heaving
R-Value
U-Factor / U-Value
Deterioration
Air Leaks and Insulation
Total R-Values for New Conventional Houses
Advantages of cellulose insulation
Typical R-values
Where to locate Insulation
Joints

Thermal Mass

How thermal mass works
Using thermal mass effectively
Choose the right amount of thermal mass
Where to locate thermal mass
Where not to locate thermal mass
Typical applications
Heat Sink
Glass to Thermal Mass ratios for different climates
Air Volume to Thermal Mass Volume Ratio
Thermal mass properties
Multi-story buildings
Earth Sheltering
Thermal mass checklist

Cooling

Four Types of Passive Cooling Systems
Ventilation
Shading
Ecological Impact of Earthships

Energy Efficient Windows

Improving the energy efficiency of existing windows
COLD WEATHER WINDOW TIPS
WARM WEATHER WINDOW TIPS
SELECTING NEW ENERGY-EFFICIENT WINDOWS
DESIGN 195 SELECTION
INSTALLATION

The Perfect Wall

Qualities to look for when choosing building materials for buildings:

How to Install Thermal Mass

tire walls
slip-form / poured
adobe bricks

water as thermal mass: tanks

How to Install Insulation

batts
rigid/panels

Thermal Envelope

Heat Loss
Heat Gain
Moisture Control
Vapor Barriers
Infiltration & Ventilation: Air Sealing Your Home

Thermographic Inspection

HOW THERMOGRAPHIC INSPECTIONS WORK
TYPES OF THERMOGRAPHIC INSPECTION DEVICES
PREPARING FOR A THERMOGRAPHIC INSPECTION

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